04
Dec

We Roofin’

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign, BTS

I feel like I am beginning to repeat myself a little, because each ad campaign I have done this year feels like one of those dream jobs.  This one for Washington Healthplanfinder was no exception.  With Obamacare rolling out I got to work with the folks at GMMB on this hilarious ad campaign.  If these images don’t convince you to get yourself some health insurance, I don’t know what will.

The first shoot (the seagull attack) took place on our own private ferry at 4:30am on a beautiful Sunday.  It was maybe one of the coolest things I have done on a shoot.  Drifting around in the Puget Sound at sunrise.  Beautiful!

The next shoot was a 4:00am call time, which feels so early to me!  Not a morning person, but the show must go on.  The skateboard crash was the hardest and most technical of all the shots.  Although my assistants might disagree since I have no idea how they managed a 12×12 and two 7 ft. softboxes on a windy ferry.

The roofing accident shot was at the end of a very long 12 hour day, but it was so fun.  The talent with the nail gun, Gabriel, had us all dying with his dialog.  I like to give people scenarios to work with when shooting this type of work.  I find it helps me work through the situation, and also helps the talent get into character and make the image more believable.  There are a lot of little details to think about on a shot like the roofing accident.  What are these guys doing?  What is happening on and off camera that I want the viewer to think about?  Are the interactions of the two guys on the roof believable?  And so on.

So for this shot, I explained to Gabriel:

You are putting a new roof on your home before the winter hits, and your good friend is helping you because he owes you a big favor (You traded him Russell Wilson for Trent Richardson in your fantasy football league.).  You are almost done with one side of the roof, when your neighbor walks by and see’s you up there.  He gives you a puzzled look because he knows you are not the handiest guy on the block.  Hey, what the heck are you doing up there!? he yells.  Gabriel looks back at his neighbor with a big smile, and says…  And this is where Gabriel took over with his improv.  ”Oh, we roofin’ man!  Yeah, we roofin’!”  ”What’s it look like we doin’ up her man, we roofin’!”  You might think over an hour of this might get old, but somehow it didn’t.  We just laughed, took pictures and, yeah, we roofin’.

Here are some of my favorite behind the scenes images from this shoot.  Big thanks to my new rep Redeye, Kontent Partners (who are super amazing people, and amazing at what they do), GMMB, Gigantic Squid, Cara Aeschliman, Gregg White, and so many more.  I am blessed to work with such fun people.

04
Jun

Snoqualmie Casino / Above It All

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign, Tear Sheets

Snoqualmie Casino ad. By photographer John Keatley.

Snoqualmie Casino ad. By photographer John Keatley.

Snoqualmie Casino ad. By photographer John Keatley.

Whoop whoop!  Here are 3 of the 6 new ads I just photographed for Snoqualmie Casino with ad agency Green Rubino.  I’m really proud of how these images came together.  Lot’s of firsts on this project.  I had my first 3:00am call time, first time shooting models jumping on a trampoline in high heels, and first time winning $100 on slots while working.

There are a ton of casino’s fighting for business these days, and most of the ads I have seen all pretty much look the same.  A dude eating a big hamburger, a pretty lady rolling dice, and a group of friends out to dinner.  Not to mention the photography is usually pretty bad.  It’s easy, and what I am sure people have come to expect from casino ads.  That is why it was so refreshing to work with Green Rubino on this campaign because it was a well put together concept with high production value.  Snoqualmie Casino is going to stand completely apart from the competition.  At least until the competition has time to scramble and try to copy this.

As always, a very big thank you to the wonderful people at Green Rubino and Snoqualmie Casino for working with us on this ad campaign.  Dennis Budel, Jason Vargas, Joe Quatrone, Peggy, and Michelle Hendrickson, congrats and well done!  Time to celebrate.

Credits:
Agency: Green Rubino
Creative Director: Joe Quatrone
Associate Creative Director: Dennis Budell
Photographer: John Keatley
Producer: Taylor Reed
Hair & Makeup: Cara Aeschliman
Wardrobe: Morgan Dillon
1st Assistant: Gregg White
2nd Assistant: Oliver Ludlow
Retouching: Gigantic Squid
CGI: Vitamin-E Studio
Talent Agency: All About You, Bell Agency

30
Apr

Heavenly Ski & Ride School

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign

Blogging has been a little less frequent than usual these days, but it’s only because I have been so busy shooting some pretty awesome ad campaigns.  We have 3 new campaigns coming out in the upcoming weeks, but before we get to those, I want to share with you this recent ad campaign.  It is for the Ski & Ride School at Heavenly Mountain Resort, and worked with Hammerquist Studios.  What a fun and hilarious concept.  In total, there are 6 different diagnosis profiles,  and you can see them in the advertising section of my site.  Big thank you’s go out to Fred Hammerquist, Dylan Kahler, and Nick Berry.  It was a blast working with you guys on this.

We got to do our own casting for this project, which is something I have really been enjoying.  The characters and types of people I like to photograph are a little harder to find, but the thrill of the search and the reward when you find that perfect person is so worth the extra effort.

Thanks to our friends at EVO for the amazing wardrobe and gear we used in the ads.  If you haven’t been to the new EVO store in Fremont, you should check it out.  It’s an incredible retail space and beautifully designed.  Even if you aren’t into outdoor adventures, the store and restaurants next door are worth a visit.

Styling:  Morgan Dillon
Hair & Makeup: Cara Aeschliman
Assistant: Gregg White
Retouching: Gigantic Squid

06
Sep

Wexley School For Girls In The Nude

Posted by Izzy / Filed under BTS

Cal McAllister of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Cal McAllister / Co-Founder and CEO

Gabe Hajiani of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Gabe Hajiani / Production Director

Stephanie Peirolo of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Stephanie Peirolo / Director of Strategic Partnerships

Christine Wise of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Christine Wise / Director of Planning and Strategy

Ian Cohen of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Ian Cohen / Co-Founder and CCO

Todd Grant of Wexley School For Girls. Photo by John Keatley.
Todd Grant / CCD

One word sums up the experience of working with the team at the Seattle based ad agency, Wexley School for Girls: AWESOME.  The long and short of it, is that these guys and gals are a riot, and life is never dull when working or hanging out with Wexley.  They never so much as bat an eyelash when John shows up asking them to take their shirts off, dress up in chicken costumes, sprawl across the baby grand, or any other fantastically strange idea John has thrown at them over the years.  Well, actually, not everyone was on board with this concept off the bat, but everyone came around eventually after a good pep talk.

Most business executives need headshots for speaking, press, articles, etc., and the leaders at Wexley are no different.  These portraits are of the Wexley senior leadership team. As you can see, not only are they all pretty much topless, but they have Sara Coates and I smashing and manipulating their faces with our hands.  At least the men do.  The women got a couple of male interns to stand in, and it just so happened to be their first day on the job.  It was awesome, and one of those shoots where we were laughing so hard we cried a little.  Some people may have cried from awkwardness too, but it can be hard to tell the difference sometimes.  Thanks Wexley for being great sports, and for working with us to create such awesome photography.  I like to think this kind of work is the stuff that stands the test of time.

These pictures have already received some of the greatest comments on Facebook.  It’s almost like a social experiment the way some people are so confused  by these portraits.  ”They aren’t really going to use those for press are they?”  Yes, yes they are.

Here is a quick behind the scenes video of the shoot.  Can’t wait to see what happens next time.

Thanks team Wexley, and thanks as always to Gigantic Squid for retouching!

14
Jun

American Indians for The Nature Conservancy

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign

American Indian portrait by photographer John Keatley.

American Indian portrait by photographer John Keatley.

American Indian portrait by photographer John Keatley.

As an artist, campaigns with a positive social impact are always very appealing to me.  PBJS in Seattle called me several months back about this campaign for The Nature Conservancy, highlighting the First Stewards Symposium in Washington DC, which takes place next month.  This is the first national climate change symposium dedicated to addressing how climate change impacts coastal indigenous people.

I got to work with some great people on this project, CD Peter Gaucys, ACD Brandon Hilliard, and AD Vinny Pacheco.  In one of our meetings about creative for this shoot, someone brought up how the only photographs we associate with American Indians are old and quite dated.  Those old black and white prints you see in a museum.  This was an opportunity to create 3 great portraits of modern American Indians surrounding a really important set of issues.  I am really proud of how these portraits turned out, and I am excited to see what comes from the symposium next month.

Below is an excerpt taken from the First Stewards website which outlines the purpose of this symposium. What a fantastic project to be a part of!

“This first-of-its-kind national event examines the impact of climate change on indigenous coastal cultures.  The symposium will bring together as many as 300 coastal indigenous tribal elders, leaders, scientists, witnesses, and other scientists and policy leaders from around the nation to discuss traditional ecological knowledge and what it can teach us about past, present, and future adaptation to climate change. Five regional panels of tribal leaders and tribal and Western scientists will examine how native people and their cultures have adapted to climate change for hundreds to thousands of years, and what their future — and that of the nation — may hold as the impacts of climate change continue.”

If you find yourself around the National Mall, Smithsonian, or the The National Museum of the American Indian in DC and you see these images on flags, banners, etc, I’d love to get some snaps.  Thanks!

29
May

Coffee Face Campaign

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under BTS, Personal Work

Coffee Face personal shoot by advertising photographer John Keatley.

Coffee Face personal shoot by advertising photographer John Keatley.

Coffee Face personal shoot by advertising photographer John Keatley.

Can you relate?  You wake up in a haze, thinking a cup of coffee will do the trick. Trying to start your day out on the right foot, but instead you get a mouthful of bitter disappointment.

I had several goals pinned on the wall as I began the process of putting together this personal series. Shoot in detailed environments. Experiment with backlight where a light source is visible, or has a prominent role in the image.  And finally, have fun with facial expressions.  That was the easy part.  The hard part was coming up with the concept to make all of the elements come together. Gives you a whole new appreciation for copywriters and art directors!
Thankfully I work with some incredible people, and after some brainstorming, the bad coffee face idea was born.

So how does a personal shoot like this come together? A lot of hard work, and a crew of talented and creative people. The car shoot was the first of the three, and this BTS video by Eric Becker is a good walkthrough of what it all looks like on set.

The second shoot was the kitchen image.  Locating and securing the home was by far the most difficult part. After finding and locking in the location, we received a text the night before the shoot, which said it was no longer happening with no explanation.  I knew that kitchen was perfect for this shot, so after a lot of leg work and negotiating, we were back on track.   There is a certain mindset I feel is invaluable and absolutely necessary to make it as a photographer.  Tattoo these phrases on your arm, and never forget them.  No excuses, always ask questions, politely don’t take no for an answer, and do whatever it takes to make it work. There is always a solution, no matter what the problems you are faced with.  Wrapping your mind around these ideas will help prepare you for the struggles you are guaranteed to face as a photographer on almost a daily basis.

I wrapped this series up with the park bench shot.  I scouted several parks in Seattle until I found a bench I really liked.  It ended up being in a large forested park, which was a perfect place to shoot.  The permit was affordable, and it was a wide open space without crowd’s of people and traffic to worry about.  After the shoot with the bench and model, I woke up at sunrise the next day, and shot around an urban neighborhood near downtown Seattle.  It is important to make sure the light and angles of the environment match the light on the bench and model so the finished product looks as realistic as possible.  I made sure all of the landscape images I shot had the sun in the correct place according to where I placed lights on the model shoot.  I also used a tripod so my camera height and angle was the same as it was during the model shoot.

I love working like this because it gives me complete control of the final image without being restricted by certain realities.

Thanks to my awesome crew for helping make this project shine.
Talent: JJ Kissinger, Gabe Rodriguez, Katelyn Price
Production: Elizabeth Atwood
Retouching: Ian Goode / Gigantic Squid
Assistants: Will Foster, Gregg White, Oliver Ludlow
BTS video and stills: Eric Becker
Hair and Makeup: Cara Aeschliman
Wardrobe: Bryan Carle

Thank you’s also go out to Seattle Parks and Rec and Windermere Capitol Hill.

06
Jul

2011 Px3 Photography Competition

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Awards

2011 Px3 photography competition winning images by John Keatley.

It’s an embarrassment of riches!  I am especially proud of the work I created over this past year, and it is an honor to have that work recognized by the international photography competition ”Prix de la Photographie, Paris” (Px3).  This is my first time in the international game, and all 5 of the images above were selected as well as 2 honorable mentions.

From left to right:

Luke Burbank, host of Too Beautiful To Live for Seattle Met.  Art Director Benjamen Purvis.
Dennis Haysbert for Seattle Met.
Keli Carender, founder of the Tea Party political movement for Seattle Met.  Art Director Benjamen Purvis.
Plants Vs. Zombies / John Vechey, co-founder of Pop Cap Games for Inc.  Photo Editor Monique Perreault.
The Keatley Family 2010.  Personal work / self promotion.

02
May

John Keatley – MiiR Ad Campaign

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign

MiiR ad campaign by photographer John Keatley.

MiiR ad campaign by photographer John Keatley.

MiiR ad campaign by photographer John Keatley.

This is the first look at a campaign I have been working on for MiiR Bottles over the past several months.  These ads will be both online and in print.  Soon to follow will be the debut of my first commercial as a director, which will be equally clever and funny.  As simple as a water bottle sounds, there are so many great ideas to work with because there are a lot of water bottles on the market that are difficult to use.  I think this comes across pretty clear in these ads.

I would like to say thank you to Bryan Papé of MiiR who is always so supportive and trusting of my vision.  And thank you, also, to Ian Goode of Gigantic Squid for making the waterbeard magic and going the extra 100 miles to make these turn out as good as they did.

If you were wondering, this is the campaign I hinted at last month when I posted an image from one of the water capture shoots.

23
Nov

Copper Mountain Colorado

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Ad Campaign, Tear Sheets

Copper Mountain Colorado Billboard

Here’s lookin at you Colorado.  I just wrapped up this shoot for Copper Mountain Resort in Colorado, and last week they released their new branding and ad campaign featuring Fred McGilicutty, captain of the snow patrol at Copper Mountain.  This billboard can currently be seen in Dallas and Kansas City.  Wish I could be there to take pictures of the actual things.  If you find yourself driving through Dallas or Kansas City, feel free to wave at Fred and tell him I said hi.  I hear it’s nice in KC this time of year.

I would like to wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving.  I feel especially thankful this year and I am very grateful for everyone who has taken the time to read my blog and take an interest in my work.  See you on the slopes.

Twitter Updates – Click to follow John’s Twitter feed.
RSS Subscription
– Click to subscribe to John Keatley Blog via RSS in a reader.
Email Updates – Click to sign up for email updates.

28
May

Hot Water Baptism

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Personal Work

 Nun

A few months ago, I reconnected with an old friend from college, Kyle Bowden.  I had not seen him for about 8 years, since we were both studying abroad in Uruguay during my senior year.  A small group of my friends all decided to study abroad together, and we went during Spring quarter in 2002.  After we had been overseas for about 6 weeks, we had an extended weekend, and decided to get out of town for a couple days.  We ended up traveling to Suriname and got in pretty late.  Just outside of the capital city of Paramaribo was an old brick convent at the base of the hillside.  Not having made sleeping arrangements in advance, some of the guys were joking around about staying the night in the convent.  I’m sure they would rent us a room for the night right?  As the joke quickly came to an end, Kyle said in a rather serious tone.  ”I am going to spend the night in that convent.”

I laughed at first, but quickly realized that he was serious.  He thought he could sneak into the convent and spend the night without being noticed.  ”No way!” was the unanimous response from the group.  But this just made Kyle even more determined.  Finally, we decided that we would see just how serious Kyle was about this idea.   We made a bet with him.  If he could pull it off, we would collectivly pay him $400.  And if he could not, he had to buy the drinks for the rest of the weekend.  

Kyle gave us his backpack, took a few snacks, and headed up toward the convent.  We agreed that we would meet back at the same spot the next day at 11:00am.   

Kyle never showed up the next day.  And through a very strange chain of events, that one night turned into three long years of isolation and canning fruit.  

In 2005, Kyle was discovered and kicked out of the convent.  He is currently living back in the States, trying to re-discover himself.

THE PHOTO SHOOT:
You know how high school kids like to yell, and mock people while driving by in a car?  I won’t go into the psychology of why they do this, but it seems to be in their nature when a group of high school guys are together.  So just imagine a group of high school boys driving along the waterfront, and as they come around the bend, there in front of them is a nun.  With her back to the car.  How could you not yell, right?  I didn’t see them approaching at first, but I heard the screams.  Two guys leaning out the windows yelling a Braveheart kind of scream at the nun as they drove by.  The other passengers smiling from ear to ear, feeling so proud about scaring and intimidating a nun.  Then suddenly, as the car passed, the nun’s face became visible.  The screams and smiles stopped as quickly as they had started, and disappeared into complete shock and confusion.  It was priceless.