07
Mar

A Photo Editor & Avoiding Creative Block

Posted by John Keatley / Filed under Blog

I have had several opportunities to guest blog, as well as give some interviews over the past few weeks and I thought I would share some of these with you.  There will be a few more in the weeks to come.  Blows my mind to be able to say that.  I am really enjoying writing and speaking which is something I have begun to do more of.  I struggle with writing or giving advice when it has not been asked for, but when someone asks me a question I find I have no shortage of thoughts and opinions.  Part of that is a hangup I have about wanting to be genuine, but I just feel much more comfortable responding to a question, rather than giving unsolicited advice.

To start off, Luke Copping asked me, along with 17 other creatives, to answer the question: How do you get out of a creative rut?

Here is the beginning of my response:

Rather than talking about getting out of a creative rut, I am going to try to help you avoid getting into a rut all together.

I probably don’t need to tell you the life of a professional photographer is filled with many highs and lows.  Victories and rejections are a weekly occurrence.  The highs are obviously fun, but the lows are not so great.

My first piece of advice is to avoid the highs and lows.  Don’t get caught up in the tidal wave of ups and downs.  It takes a lot of adjustments to do this, but it is possible and well worth it.  You don’t need to live in each high and each low.  Learn to enjoy and appreciate accomplishments and victories in your career, but understand that it is temporary and tomorrow is a new day.  Typically the phrase “tomorrow is a new day” is reserved for people who are living in a low and need something to look forward to.  However, in photography, “tomorrow is a new day” also means someone else is going to do something noteworthy tomorrow and the spotlight will shift to them.

Second, learning how to not live in the highs and lows of your career keeps you from freaking out when you have a slow week or two.  Create a consistent marketing plan and stick to it.  Aside from shooting, there are plenty of important tasks and projects you need to put time into if you want to be successful.  Making sure you are taking time for these activities and tasks will help you keep your mind off of shooting all the time, and personally I find this to help keep me balanced and creative.

You can continue reading my response along with the rest of the post at 18 Imaginative Thinkers Break Your Creative Block.

Also worth mentioning, A Photo Editor gave me a really nice shout out last Friday, in relation to the Creative Block piece on Luke’s blog.  My first time on APE, so that was especially exciting.

I just started using FoundFolios, which is a great online portfolio site for connecting photographers with art buyers.  I will be rolling out some new work on there in the near future, and the FoundFolios Blog just posted a short blurb about my Liberia photo shoot for MiiR Bottles.

Last but not least, I gave an interview a few weeks back for the Smartpress Blog which is geared toward people who are just starting out in photography.

Thank you to Luke Copping, Rob Haggart, Juliette Wolf-Robin, and Sean Taylor for expressing interest in my work, and sharing it with others.